Nationwide® Veterinary Analytics

To download the white paper as a pdf, click here.

To download the methodology for the white paper, click here.

To reach Nationwide’s veterinary analytics team with questions, comments or media requests, contact Nationwide’s Corporate Communications team at news@nationwide.com

Information available as of January 12th, 2022.

doodles

Oodles of Doodles: Analysis summary

Doodle popularity is up, and Doodle parent breed popularity is down.

Poodle crosses increased as a relative share of Nationwide’s pet health insurance policies, while the relative share of the parent breeds fell.

Doodles are considerably less likely to have had a claim submitted for cancer diagnosis or treatment.

Relative risk for cancer claims is dramatically lower in Labradoodles and Goldendoodles compared with their contributing breeds—Standard Poodles, Golden Retrievers and Labrador Retrievers.

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Nationwide® has been protecting pets for 40 years, and in 2021 the company reached the landmark of actively protecting more than a million companion animals in the United States. This analysis is the first of a series of analyses in 2022 and beyond on pet health and the finances of veterinary care. With these studies, Nationwide draws on decades of policy and claims data and vast veterinary expertise, providing insights to drive positive change in pet health care. Nationwide is committed to advancing the evolution of pet protection through leadership in pet health data and to pioneering positive change in veterinary health care.

In an analysis of 1.6 million Nationwide-insured dogs from 2013 to 2021, Poodle crosses of all kinds were up 160%, with Labradoodles and Goldendoodles showing an even sharper rise. Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers and Standard Poodles all showed declines over the same period.

Purebreds, crossbreds, and cancer claims

As part of a larger study on relative cancer risk in 1.61 million dogs over a six-year period, Nationwide looked at Doodles and cancer. Relative risk for cancer claims is dramatically lower in Labradoodles and Goldendoodles compared with their contributing breeds—Standard Poodles, Golden Retrievers and Labrador Retrievers.

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